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D.A. King: Immigration should benefit U.S., not just immigrants

By D.A. King, Marietta Daily Journal, October 29, 2010

Summary:

is worth the trouble to go online and read the KSU conference "schedule of activities" for other headings for oh-so-enlightened presentations. My favorite title is "Mayans, Mexicans, Public Policy, Applied Anthropology and the limits of Highway Safety in the Suburbs." (Alan LeBaron, a KSU professor). I am not making any of this up ... honest.

The A.L. Burruss Institute of Public Service and Research at Kennesaw State University is hosting a three-day conference that begins today titled "Immigration in the Southeast: Defining Problems, Finding Solutions."

Put this long-time American down as firmly supportive of all U.S. universities properly educating students on immigration. As someone who has been studying "immigration" for nearly a decade, I can say without equivocation that there is plenty to learn.

Heck, if I had known about the extravaganza, I would have tried to find the $55 registration fee and attend. The last time KSU hosted a large event on "immigration," many citizens got their first exposure to former-Mexican president Vicente Fox's - and the Wall Street Journal's - plan for open borders in North America and an "American Union" based on the EU. It was a hoot.

The list of speakers in the online flyer for the latest shindig - if anyone else has stumbled on it - should create questions on what may get left out of the "research" and "promotion of understanding." It's a veritable who's-who of the anti-enforcement, amnesty-again mouthpieces.

The presenters who will provide insight for the promised "White Paper" to be produced from the KSU event include two from the liberal and pro-legalization Brookings Institution, the Consul General of Mexico in Atlanta, the Atlanta Consul General of Guatemala, Mexican citizen Adelina Nichols of the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights ("Stop the raids and deportations!") who in 2003 brought in two speakers from the Socialist Workers Party - including one of the party's leaders, Roger Calero - to advise a meeting of "Georgians for Safer Roads," (an organization founded by the perpetually angry, anti-enforcement extremist Jerry Gonzalez of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials). The goal then was Georgia driver's licenses for illegal aliens. Or just plain "immigrants" in the shameful Newspeak of the open borders crowd.

Another notable speaker who is scheduled to join Comrade Nichols in presenting a segment titled "Teaching and working on Immigration Issues and Rights in Georgia" is the ACLU's Azadeh Shahshahani, who also heads the Georgia Detention Watch. GDW's stated objective? "We are dedicated to stopping the proliferation of 287(g) Agreements between localities and federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials as well as other attempts at local enforcement of immigration laws in Georgia." There is a pattern here.

It is worth the trouble to go online and read the KSU conference "schedule of activities" for other headings for oh-so-enlightened presentations. My favorite title is "Mayans, Mexicans, Public Policy, Applied Anthropology and the limits of Highway Safety in the Suburbs." (Alan LeBaron, a KSU professor). I am not making any of this up ... honest.

It is unlikely that the late immigration expert Barbara Jordan (D-Texas) will be quoted. Or noted. "It is both a right and a responsibility of a democratic society to manage immigration so that it serves the national interest," said the first black woman elected to Congress from the Deep South.

Jordan, who was appointed to head then-president Bill Clinton's Commission on Immigration Reform - and was awarded a 1994 Presidential Medal of Freedom - also testified to Congress on what it would take to gain credibility on immigration policy: "Those who should get in, get in; those who should be kept out, are kept out; and those who should not be here will be required to leave - deportation is crucial."

On the criminal employers who lure illegals into our republic, Jordan recommended mandatory electronic verification of legal employment eligibility. "Employer sanctions can work," she said.

Woe unto Jordan were she alive today and so openly pro-enforcement.

Something else I am guessing won't be echoing off the walls at KSU's secretive conference: Immigration must be sustainable, and unless we enforce immigration laws, we have defacto open borders. At more than a million each year, the United States takes in more real, legal immigrants than any nation on the planet. We have nothing to apologize for. As Jordan noted, immigration should benefit America and Americans, not serve as a pressure-relief valve for failing Third-World nations that unashamedly enforce their own immigration laws.

There is much more to being an immigrant - and an American - than escaping capture at our borders. And there is no universal civil right to migrate to the United States of America.

D.A. King is president of the Cobb-based Dustin Inman Society and a nationally recognized authority on illegal immigration. (http://www.TheDustinInmanSociety.org)

Read more: The Marietta Daily Journal - D A King Immigration should benefit U S not just immigrants

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